Education: Laser cutting for FabLabs, Universities and Schools

Model building, textile design, furniture construction, industrial design

Laser applications for universities, such as laser cutting of cardboard, laser engraving of theses and yearbooks
Laser cutting for rapid prototyping, creative design on plastic. Here is an overview of MetaQuip lasers and what impact is on education: laser cutting for FabLabs, Universities and Schools.

Materials

Acrylics, films and films, wood, cardboard, plastics, MDF, paper, PMMA, polystyrene, foam, synthetic materials, textiles, veneer, and much more.

Laser cutters for FabLabs and schools

At fablabs, universities and schools MetaQuip laser engraving machines are used for model building, textile design, furniture construction or for example for industrial design. The incredible and inspiring design options that laser technology offers are also ideal for art projects. In that case, our laser machines are used for processing many different materials.

DIY projects made of various materials

Many different materials are used in digital processing, including cardboard, paper, MDF, wood and acrylic. But also textiles, plastics, polystyrene and films can be perfectly processed. Moreover, it is not necessary to take into account the diameter of the spot size. Depending on the lens used, the laser beam is approximately 0.1mm wide. Practically every shape can be cut with the laser.

Prototyping and industrial design

Due to the flexible nature of the laser, it is very suitable for experimental setups and the construction of prototypes. Designs are sent directly from the CAD program to the laser. As a result, tests can be realized in different phases.

Benefits

More information

Machines that MetaQuip often supplies to educational institutions are the MQ5030 60W, MQ1060 100W and MQ4040 40 or 60W.
More information about CO2 laser machines and possibilities. Go to the CO2 laser machine overview page ...

Education: Laser cutting for FabLabs, Universities and Schools was last modified: January 5th, 2019 by Coen Lauwerijssen